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New Equity Lens moves union from commitment to action

Publish date: Wednesday, August 12, 2020 update

AMAPCEO Equity Lens

AMAPCEO took a big step forward on equity and inclusion when the Board of Directors approved the union’s first-ever Equity Lens at its last meeting.

The Equity Lens is a practical tool to help the union—its members, activists, and staff—to be consistent and deliberate in moving equity and inclusion forward. It was designed by the AMAPCEO Equity Committee and their Equity Lens Working Group.

The Lens includes a set of guiding questions for each stage of program delivery—planning, execution, and evaluation. These questions will help diagnose barriers to participation and the development of best practices for the benefit of individual members and the union as a whole.

When fully implemented, the Equity Lens will be applied to every AMAPCEO program offering.

“The Lens will ensure that AMAPCEO is delivering our high-quality services with equity and inclusion from the get-go,” said Vice-President Cynthia Watt, who also chairs the Equity Committee. “It’s another tool in our toolbox towards a more inclusive union.

AMAPCEO staff will add the Lens to its operational planning and programming in the fall, while the Lens will be rolled out to activists in the winter. The Lens will also be available to all AMAPCEO members through the union’s website. Stay tuned to Member News for more information.

 

More about AMAPCEO and our Members: Established in 1992, AMAPCEO is a bargaining agent that represents 14,000 professional and supervisory public servants, most of whom work directly for the Government of Ontario in every ministry and in a number of agencies, boards and commissions; in 130 communities throughout Ontario and in 12 cities outside Canada. We also represent employees outside the Ontario Public Service in: the Financial Services Regulatory Authority of Ontario; Health Quality Ontario; the Ontario Arts Council; Public Health Ontario; the Waypoint Mental Health Centre in Penetanguishene; and in the former Offices of the Ontario Child Advocate and the French Language Services Commissioner (now part of the Ontario Ombudsman).